Victorian Tumblr Themes
ladyherenya:

sara-wrote-this:

vancity604778kid:

fifty-shades-of-shade:

wetravelfast00:

geatc:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts, Follow Ultrafacts

This country is really absurd sometimes…

But we know we love it, though.

that’s why when I say “sorry” to ppl in the states they always dismiss my display of empathy saying “why are you saying sorry? it’s not your fault.” of course it’s not my fault! I want to help u feel bettah gawddd



"Sorry" means something different in Canada than it does in other places.
In Canada, if something bad happens and you say sorry, it means “I acknowledge that you have been inconvenienced or otherwise harmed, and I am expressing sympathy. I’d prefer it if the bad thing had not happened.”
We apologize for things constantly.
"Sorry I’m late, traffic was horrible!" Sorry about the traffic.
"Ugh, I think I caught the flu!" Sorry you have the flu. That must be unpleasant.
"My house was burglarized and everything of value stolen!" Oh wow, I’m sorry. That’s a terrible experience.
And so on. It’s rude not to apologize, because failing to apologize suggests you do not care.
There is even commercials up here in Canada about how we Canadians like to apologize for everything.
Sorry.



The moment when you think, “Am I half-Canadian or do I just apologize too often?”

Using sorry to express sympathy isn’t unique to Canada. That’s perfectly normal usage in my part of the world (Australia) and I’ve never come across anything suggesting that we apologise too much!
It’s not a colloquialism, either. At least, my dictionaries don’t indicate it as such (and I got a bit carried away and consulted more than one). The first definition is “feeling regret, compunction, sympathy, pity etc”. Then you’ve got: “2. of a deplorable, pitiful or miserable kind: to come to a sorry end. 3. sorrowful, grieved or sad” and so on. So as a word sorry seems to be more closely tied to sorrow and pity rather than to any acknowledgement of fault.   
Another common use for sorry here is a short “sorry?” when you haven’t heard someone properly. Meaning: “I missed what you just said, could you say it again please?”
(So now I’m wondering, is this like the zed / zee thing…?)

I believe this is an extended joke about how Canadians apologize more than Americans.  But I wouldn’t pick expressing sympathy as the way we say sorry more than Americans… more like apologizing to people you don’t really need to apologize to for silly things you don’t really need to apologize for.  
(Although the Apology Act is a real thing, at least in Ontario.)  

ladyherenya:

sara-wrote-this:

vancity604778kid:

fifty-shades-of-shade:

wetravelfast00:

geatc:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts, Follow Ultrafacts

This country is really absurd sometimes…

But we know we love it, though.

that’s why when I say “sorry” to ppl in the states they always dismiss my display of empathy saying “why are you saying sorry? it’s not your fault.” of course it’s not my fault! I want to help u feel bettah gawddd

"Sorry" means something different in Canada than it does in other places.

In Canada, if something bad happens and you say sorry, it means “I acknowledge that you have been inconvenienced or otherwise harmed, and I am expressing sympathy. I’d prefer it if the bad thing had not happened.”

We apologize for things constantly.

"Sorry I’m late, traffic was horrible!"
Sorry about the traffic.

"Ugh, I think I caught the flu!"
Sorry you have the flu. That must be unpleasant.

"My house was burglarized and everything of value stolen!"
Oh wow, I’m sorry. That’s a terrible experience.

And so on. It’s rude not to apologize, because failing to apologize suggests you do not care.

There is even commercials up here in Canada about how we Canadians like to apologize for everything.

Sorry.

The moment when you think, “Am I half-Canadian or do I just apologize too often?”

Using sorry to express sympathy isn’t unique to Canada. That’s perfectly normal usage in my part of the world (Australia) and I’ve never come across anything suggesting that we apologise too much!

It’s not a colloquialism, either. At least, my dictionaries don’t indicate it as such (and I got a bit carried away and consulted more than one). The first definition is “feeling regret, compunction, sympathy, pity etc”. Then you’ve got: “2. of a deplorable, pitiful or miserable kind: to come to a sorry end. 3. sorrowful, grieved or sad” and so on. So as a word sorry seems to be more closely tied to sorrow and pity rather than to any acknowledgement of fault.   

Another common use for sorry here is a short “sorry?” when you haven’t heard someone properly. Meaning: “I missed what you just said, could you say it again please?”

(So now I’m wondering, is this like the zed / zee thing…?)

I believe this is an extended joke about how Canadians apologize more than Americans.  But I wouldn’t pick expressing sympathy as the way we say sorry more than Americans… more like apologizing to people you don’t really need to apologize to for silly things you don’t really need to apologize for.  

(Although the Apology Act is a real thing, at least in Ontario.)  

clavisa:

A long words mix for DogeVergeBerrians
Songs with curious lyrics and wordplay for mischievites, auspicious persons, and amators of Tibbles. 

This is AMAZING.  
I humbly submit for your additional appreciation one of the best funny-word songs of all time. 

clavisa:

A long words mix for DogeVergeBerrians

Songs with curious lyrics and wordplay for mischievites, auspicious persons, and amators of Tibbles. 

This is AMAZING.  

I humbly submit for your additional appreciation one of the best funny-word songs of all time

I may need to start getting up earlier so I have more time to freak out about NMTD before work if need be.

omgcheckplease:

Probably the most educational dmen ever.

R&H #3

« first comic »

Pumpkin chai latte, courtesy DavidsTea’s pumpkin chai tea, a leftover latte disc from my mom’s Tassimo, and a little bit of cinnamon on top. 

Pumpkin chai latte, courtesy DavidsTea’s pumpkin chai tea, a leftover latte disc from my mom’s Tassimo, and a little bit of cinnamon on top. 

ladyherenya:

anonsally:

lulabo:

I bet none of these maybe-parents ever find out about maybe-dead Hero Duke

RIGHT?! The fact that Pedro’s been close with Bea for a long time probably means she’s familiar to his parents, so if they found out her cousin was maybe-dead, they would probably get involved in that—though, if they’re worried that their own child has run away (“fled this night from Messina!”) or is missing, they don’t have time to be worried about someone else’s kid, even if that’s a close friend to their family. It’s too much to take on when you’re not sure where your son is sleeping.

The aunties would have to know if Hero was hospitalized, though, right? Like, they would need to be giving consent and authorizing stuff. They might not come home if Leo and Bea and Hero were able to convince them that the ambulance was just a precaution and Hero’s totally fine, but if she were admitted, they would probably not be cool still hanging out in Italy. 

I find this whole aspect of the show to be utterly fascinating—like on shows like Gossip Girl, kids acting like adults is just this simulacra of adulthood that’s sort of grotesque in how completely out of tune it is with the fact that these are kids in high school, which is part of the point of it, but it never treats the characters as anything other than adults who happen to be in high school, which is not terribly interesting as a concept. But in THIS kind of situation, where they’re all autonomous young people, many of whom have good heads on their shoulders, and they’re not “acting like adults,” they’re simply navigating the things that are happening to them to the best of their abilities. It’s like, nothing happening right now is necessarily going to be unique to high school for the rest of your life, but the fact that it’s happening to you at this stage of your life makes it resonate in such a different way. I love that—I don’t know if I’m articulating it well, but I love it. 

I love this last point. I think this is getting at the reason why I am still interested in stories whose characters are that age even though I’m in my early 40s. 

As far as the parental situation… First, for those who may have forgotten: Leo is in his young 20s because he’s finished university; his and Hero’s mums and Bea’s parents have not left their high school children completely without “adult” supervision. Still, Leo is obviously not really enough of an adult to act as a parent.

As far as parents needing to be around if Hero’s in the hospital, I assume that emergency care can be done without their consent. My thought is that by the time they could’ve gotten home, Hero would already be mostly better. It’s even possible that the ambulance went to the house but the paramedics were able to provide whatever she needed and she stabilised enough not to need to be admitted? But this is stretching it, obviously.

Since Hero’s mums are travelling, there are times when they are not contactable due to timezone differences or because they’re out of range. So I’d find it quite believable that there might be a delay in letting them know about an emergency - and by the time they do find out, Bea / Hero / Leo are composed enough to convincingly downplay the situation.  I don’t think any of them would want the mums (or aunts, from Bea’s perspective) to have to come home early. It’d be more likely for one of Bea’s parents to fly over, if parents were needed… but since they presumably ask fewer questions about Hero’s wellbeing than Hero’s parents do, it could be easy for Bea to keep them in the dark. 

I can imagine Bea wanting to deal with things herself, without parents interfering; Hero wouldn’t want to make a fuss or ruin any one else’s plans, and Leo would perhaps be feeling guilty, thinking that he should be able to handle things without having to call in the reinforcements.   

re: giving consent for / authorizing medical treatments, I don’t know what the law is like in NZ but the understanding I have gleaned from tumblr is that the US is much stricter/more rigorous about this than most countries.  Definitely stricter than here in Canada, anyway.  

I switched over my closet from summer to winter clothes yesterday and I am UNBELIEVABLY THRILLED to be reunited with my sweatpants and long-sleeved t-shirts.  

<3<3<3 fall <3<3<3

pocketpadfoot:

I’m gonna start a gang. We all wear comfy sweaters and cute bottoms and go camp in the woods and talk about Harry Potter and roast marshmallows and drink lots of warm drinks while taking selfies

this is exactly what being in Girl Guides was like.

graceebooks:

greasydylanobrien:

are there any laws pertaining to the moon

image

yo they have been making space law (formally, air and space law) since at least the 1950s. They have been making space law for so long that one of my old jobs was to delete catalogue records for the old air and space law books that the library threw out because they were so out of date (i.e. “1962 Review of Developments in Soviet Air and Space Law”).

allthecanadianpolitics:

Aboriginal women ask Stephen Harper: Am I next?

Am I next?

That’s the question aboriginal women are asking Prime Minister Stephen Harper in a new online campaign to renew pressure on his government to call a national inquiry into murdered and missing indigenous women.

Coming on the heels of Harper’s "sociological phenomenon" blunder, the campaign is the brainchild of Holly Jarrett. She’s the cousin of Loretta Saunders, a 26-year-old Inuit student at Saint Mary’s University who was murdered earlier this year. At the time of her death, Saunders was working on her thesis on murdered and missing aboriginal women.

"She had come through a lot of the same kind of struggles that a lot women affected by colonialism and residential school stuff," Jarrett told PressProgress Friday, a day after  launching the Am I Next campaign.

"We wanted to move it forward for her. She was really passionate about telling her story, to stand up and tell the brutal truth," said Jarrett, an Inuit from the Labrador coast who’s now based in Hamilton, Ont.

After organizing one of the largest petitions at change.org calling on the government to launch a public inquiry into hundreds of missing and murdered aboriginal women, Jarrett decided to launch the Am I Next campaign.

It’s inspired by the Inuktitut word ain, a term of endearment for someone you love in her native language.

Here are some of the faces of the viral campaign: